NASPE and APENS Standards

A basic philosophical tenet of APENS is that Physical Educators who teach students in integrated or segregated environments must be able to demonstrate basic instructional competencies. As outlined in the APENS structure (link) the APENS standards are set up in levels.  Each level represents a thread of knowledge that begins in Physical Education and concludes with specific information and application to addressing the needs of children with disabilities.  The APENS standards for Adapted Physical Educators are logical extensions of the Advanced  Physical Educators Standards (NASPE, 2001). The  table below shows the comparison between APENS and the NASPE/NCATE standards. It should be noted that the APEN standards, although developed before the NASPE standards, clearly reflect the content of the NASPE standards.

NASPE Standards (2001) APEN Standards (Kelly, 1995)
1. Content Knowledge:
Master physical educators have a command of the subject matter of physical education that reflects both breadth and depth that promotes lifetime physical activity.
1. Human Development
2. Motor Behavior
3. Exercise Science
4. Measurement and Evaluation
5. History and Philosophy
7. Curriculum Theory and Development
8. Assessment
9. Instructional Design and Planning
10. Teaching
12. Program Evaluation
2. Curricular Knowledge:
Master physical educators consistently articulate a value base for selecting, planning,and evaluating their curriculum to meet student needs
4. Measurement & Evaluation
7. Curriculum Theory and Development
9. Instructional Design and Planning
12. Program Evaluation
3. Equity/Fairness/Diversity:
Master physical educators model and promote behavior appropriate in a diverse society by showing respect for and valuing all members of their communities and by having high expectations that their students will treat one another fairly and with dignity.
3. Exercise Science
6. Unique Attributes of Learners
11. Consultation and Staff Development
14. Ethics
15. Communication
4. Sound Teaching Practices:
Master physical educators thoroughly comprehend the fundamental goals of physical education blending relevant principles of pedagogical practice with the complex nature of the physical education content.
9. Instructional Design and Planning
10. Teaching
5. Assessment:
Master physical educators consistently use a variety of authentic assessments aligned with national and state standards, state and local program goals, and student outcome goals to provide feedback to students, report student progress, shape instruction, and evaluate curriculum and program goals.
4. Measurement and Evaluation
8. Assessment
12. Program Evaluation
6. High Expectations for a Physically Active Lifestyle:
Master physical educators maintain a stimulating, productive learning environment that holds all students to the highest expectations for a physically active lifestyle.
7. Curriculum Theory and Development
10. Teaching
15. Communication
7. Methods of Inquiry:
Master physical educators know, understand, interpret, critique, and consistently use research to improve teaching practice.
8. Assessment
12. Program Evaluation
13. Continuing Education
14. Ethics
8. Collaboration, Reflection, Leadership,and Professionalism:
Master physical educators are lifelong learners who collaborate as members of a larger learning community to improve school physical education for all students and enhance the professional culture of their field.
11. Consultation and Staff Development
13. Continuing Education
14. Ethics
15. Communication
9. Mentoring:
Master physical educators contribute to the professional development and support of other current and/or future educators.
11. Consultation and Staff Development
15. Communication.